Prevention of Parental Abduction – Recognizing the Warning Signs


Source: Jeanne M. Hannah

Prevention of Parental Abduction | Recognizing the Red Flags

Families are under so much stress in today’s society–financial and relationship stress–that parentalabduction of the children may become an issue in any given family. I have often been contacted in the past year by a parent who says his/her spouse has taken the children and moved to another state. I advise them of their rights under the UCCJEA, and of the importance of protecting home state jurisdiction by seeking return of the children to their home state before six months have elapsed, after which the new state may become the “home state” of the children where a custody battle would have to be waged. [A later post will discuss the concept of “extended home state jurisdiction.”]

Abduction prevention and recovery of abducted children has become a major part of my practice. Because the effects of abduction on children can be very serious [See Part I of this series], it is important for parents to put preventative measures in place. The purpose of today’s post is to provide parents with information to help them assess whether they should be concerned about parental abduction.

Red flags” identified by the Department of State.The Department of State identifies the following “red flags” or warning signs of risk. [See “A Family Resource Guide on International Parental Kidnapping” [From the Office of Juvenile Justice and Deliquency Prevention] at pages 4-5.] The Resource Guide also discusses profiles common to abducting or “taking parents.” While most parents don’t have to worry about a parent taking the child or children to a foreign country, the warning signs for interstate kidnapping are generally about the same as those for international kidnapping.According to the OJJDP, although there are no foolproof warning signs or psychological profiles for abduction risk, there are some indicators that should not be ignored. Parents are urged to be alert to the warning signs that an international kidnapping may be in the offing.

It may be a “red flag” if a parent has:

•    Previously abducted or threatened to abduct the child. Some threats are unmistakable,
such as when an angry or vindictive parent verbally threatens to kidnap the child so
that “you will never see the child again.” Others are less direct. For instance, you
may learn about the other parent’s plans through casual conversation with your child.
•    Citizenship in another country and strong emotional or cultural ties to the country of origin. [For interestate kidnapping, the obvious red flag is–family ties and friends in other states, with none in the state where the children are living with both parents.
•    Friends or family living in another country (or, in some cases another state).
•    No strong ties to the child’s home state.
•    A strong support network.
•    No financial reason to stay in the area (e.g., the parent is unemployed, able to work
anywhere, or is financially independent).
• Engaged in planning activities, such as quitting a job; selling a home; terminating a lease; closing a bank account or liquidating other assets; hiding or destroying documents; or securing a passport, a birth certificate, or school or medical records.
•    A history of marital instability, lack of cooperation with the other parent, domestic violence, or child abuse.
•    Reacted jealously to or felt threatened by the other parent’s remarriage or new romantic involvement.
•    A criminal record.

Are there personality profiles of parents who may pose an abduction risk?

OJJDP has identified six personality profiles that may be helpful in predicting which parents may pose a risk of abduction, using the identifications presented by Girdner and Johnston in their research report Prevention of Family Abduction Through Early Identification of Risk Factors. That report is listed in the “Recommended Reading” section at the end of the OJJDP guide. OJJDP cautions that while these profiles may be helpful in predicting which parents may pose a risk of abduction, they do not guarantee that parents who fit a particular profile will abduct or that parents who do not fit a profile will not.

The six profiles are:

•    Profile l: Parents who have threatened to abduct or have abducted previously.
•    Profile 2: Parents who are suspicious or distrustful because of their belief that abuse has occurred and who have social support for their belief.
•    Profile 3: Parents who are paranoid.
•    Profile 4: Parents who are sociopathic.
•    Profile 5: Parents who have strong ties to another country and are ending a mixed-culture marriage. [For interstate abductions, this may be strong ties to another state and/or strong family ties to a dysfunctional family.]
•    Profile 6: Parents who feel disenfranchised from the legal system (e.g., those who are poor, a minority, or victims of abuse) and have family and social support.

According to the OJJDP Guide, taking parents across the six personality profiles share many common characteristics.

  • They are likely to deny or dismiss the value of the other parent to the child.
  • They believe they know what is best for the child, and they cannot see how or why they should share parenting with the other parent.
  • They are likely to have very young children who are easy to transport and conceal and who are unlikely to protest verbally or tell others of their plight.
  • With the exception of the paranoid profile, abducting parents are apt to have the financial and moral support of a network of family, friends, and/or cultural, community, or underground groups.
  • Many abductors do not consider their actions illegal or morally wrong.
  • Finally, according to the Guide, mothers and fathers are equally likely to abduct, although at different times—fathers before a court order, mothers after an order has been made.

Parents who fit profile 5—those who are citizens of another country (or who have dual citizenship with the United States) and who also have strong ties to their extended family in their country of origin—have long been recognized as those who might engage in international parental abduction. The risk is especially acute at the time of parental separation and divorce, when the parent feels cast adrift from a mixed-culture marriage and a need to return to ethnic or religious roots for emotional support and to reconstitute a shaken self-identity. Often, in reaction to being rendered helpless or to the insult of feeling rejected and discarded by the ex-spouse, a parent may try to take unilateral action by returning with the child to his or her family of origin. This is a way of insisting that one cultural identity be given preeminent status over the other in the child’s upbringing. Often the parent will have idealized his or her own culture, childhood, and family of origin.

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World Renowned Child Abduction Recovery Experts ABP World Group: Christmas is the Season for International Child Abduction – Parents Must Take Extra Precautions


Source: Yahoo.com

As international parental child abduction surges throughout the world, ABP World Group, one of the world’s leading child and adult abduction and kidnapping recovery security agencies is warning parents of the possibility of international abduction and urging them to take precautionary steps, including using newly developed, inexpensive GPS tracking systems for their children. Martin Waage, Managing Director of ABP World Group offers sound advice for targeted children and parents at risk of abduction.

New York, Los Angeles, Oslo (PRWEB) December 14, 2011

Martin Waage, the Managing Director of the internationally recognized security firm ABP World Group, and head of the firm’s international child abduction recovery division is warning parents all over the world that the Christmas Holiday Season is considered one of the highest periods for international parental child abduction, and that parents, particularly those who are in volatile multi-cultural relationships and who feel the other parent may have intent to illegally leave the country with the children of their relationship must take extra precautions in order to protect their children’s safety.

ABP World Group is one of the world’s leading child and adult abduction recovery experts, and have participated remarkably in over 200 child-parent reunifications alone.

 

Mr. Waage commented, “International parental child abductions happens during the Christmas holidays as well as during the summer vacations. With international child abductions happening at a record pace, ABP World Group urges parents to take every precaution to protect their children from this horrible fate.

“Tragically, the number of global parental abductions occurring is an unknown due to failures by governments to keep accurate data; however, if we view the United States as a microcosm of the rest of the world, it is estimated that there will be between 100,000 and 125,000 children criminally abducted from now to 2020 alone. And Canada is no better as this nation’s numbers could reach over 12,000 to 15,000 abductions when we consider the current reported cases of abduction, combine that with the forecasted unreported cases of abduction, and factor in a 20% growth factor, which is a modest factor in comparison to various government reports recently issued by various nations concerning abduction.

“Undeniably, Christmas presents a serious problem. As many targeted parents who have had their children abducted have said over and over, they were taken off guard and never knew or anticipated that their child would be criminally removed to another country by their other parent.”

The United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and many ‘Western’ countries are members of the Hague Convention On The Civil Aspects Of International Child Abduction, which is the international treaty that many nations have signed to address the issue of cross-border parental child kidnapping. However, many countries in the Middle East and Asia are not signatories to the international treaty, and around the world, many nation’s who have signed the convention do not necessarily follow the spirit and intent of the treaty.

Martin Waage added, “The reality of international parental child abduction is that when we considered the reported and unreported cases, and also consider how our world governments consider whether a case has actually been closed or not, the truth is, what various non-government organization stakeholders are citing, such as ABP World Group, is that the actual percentage of children actually returned back to the country they were taken to is somewhere around 5%. This is a tragic number – but then all we have to do is look at countries such as Japan that have never returned a Western born child back to that child’s country of original jurisdiction.”

ABP World Group suggest that all parents be mindful that international parental child abduction is a growing epidemic. Accordingly, If a parents says they’re going to take the child out of the country, the targeted parent should immediately contact their local police and a lawyer that is specialized in family matters.

Still, clever thinking is a must. Mr. Waage commented, “It might be a good idea to consider equipping your child with a small GPS locator that can be hidden almost anywhere. The locator can warn you by SMS and e-mail if the child is taken outside a pre set area.

“By using a GPS unit, you will know where your child is at all times. And these GPS units can really be placed almost anywhere. Instead of receiving the information about the abduction after days when they have already left the country, you can by using a GPS tracker receive a warning immediately. This can buy you enough time, so you can warn the police and make them prevent your child from being removed out of the country.

“ABP World Group Ltd. has been assisting left behind parents, and recovering abducted children for more than 12 years. We have tested hundreds of different GPS tracking systems, but found that the majority of them do not work well. Either they have to short stand by time, or they have poor signal strength or user friendliness. Until now.

 

“ABP World Group strongly recommend the [Garmin GTU 10 Tracker. It`s small, light and have some incredible testing result. We have been successfully using this unit for some time now, and we recommend that every parent concerned with their child’s safety use it. And in fact, the price is also reasonable (around 177 USD at Amazon.com)

 

“The GTU 10 is small, lightweight and waterproof. It easily attaches to a backpack, inside a teddy bear, inside a jackets pocket etc. When you purchase a new GTU 10, it comes with 1 year of Standard Tracking, so you’ll be ready to go once you register and activate it in your Garmin account. Then, you can view the location of your GTU 10 on a map from the friendly confines of your computer. For an added level of convenience, you can download the free Garmin Tracker app for your mobile device. Using your computer or mobile device, you can also create up to 10 geo-fences (virtual boundaries) for your device. When your GTU 10 enters or exits a geo-fence, an email or text message can be sent warning you that the GTU 10 is in a certain location.”

 

For more information about how to prevent international parental child abduction please visit the official Website of ABP World Group. ABP World Group has operatives and agents operating in the many nations throughout the world, or visit ABP World Group’s Contact Page.

 

Published by: ABP World Group International Child Recovery Services

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GPS Tracking for Kids / Children – Garmin GTU 10 Tracker


Can GPS Prevent Child Abductions?

Want to know where your child is right now? You can… it’s easy! You can watch the movement of your child anytime, anywhere from your web-enabled Smart-Phone or computer.

(CBS)  The recent recovery of Jaycee Lee Dugard, who was located 18 years after being abducted by a stranger, once again has parents thinking about how to protect their own kids. That’s one of the reasons behind a growing number of child locator products that typically use GPS and a cellular device to help a parents and authorities pinpoint a missing child to within a few yards.

Before getting into the technology, here are some important statistics to put this problem into context.

Stranger abduction is rare

A 2002 study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Justice found that, in one year, 797,500 children were reported missing. That’s a lot, but most of them weren’t abducted. Of those, 203,900 were family abductions, which means the abductor was related to the child, often a noncustodial parent. Some 58,200 were “nonfamily abductions,” but that doesn’t necessarily mean strangers were responsible. And 115 children, a tiny fraction of those reported missing, were victims of what the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) calls “stereotypical kidnapping,” which involves “someone child does not know or someone of slight acquaintance, who holds the child overnight, transports the child 50 miles or more, kills the child, demands ransom, or intends to keep the child permanently.”

Garmin GTU 10

The potential loss of 115 children a year is a national tragedy, but to put it into perspective, there are 74 million children and teens in America; the odds of it happening are about 1 in 644,000, or about the same risk as being struck by lightning.

Still, it does happen and just because most abductions are carried out by family members or acquaintances doesn’t mean that they’re not potentially tragic. But it does mean that “stranger danger” is not the biggest threat to our children. In fact, because so many children are exploited by acquaintances and family members, NCMEC has stopped using that term and now refers to it as a “misguided message,” because “children don’t get it, adults don’t practice it (and) it doesn’t go far enough in protecting children from potential danger.” Plus, when a child is in trouble, sometimes their protector can be a stranger such as a police officer, a mall security guard, or a passerby.

Reasons for concern

Having said this, there is still a logical reason for parents and guardians to consider equipping their children with a device that can help locate them in an emergency. For one thing, these devices can bring peace of mind. Parents worry about their kids for a lot of reasons beyond being taken by a stranger. Have they wandered off? Did they get into an accident? Could they be lost? And it’s not just little kids we worry about. Parents of teenagers are rightfully concerned when they’re kids are away from home, especially if they’re riding or driving in cars. To be honest, my kids are now in their 20s and I still worry about them.


Technologies

There are various technologies that can help protect children, ranging from devices that send out a local alarm that can be heard from a couple hundred feet away, to very sophisticated dedicated GPS tracking devices.

ABP World Group Recommends the Garmin GTU 10 Tracker.

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GPS Tracking / Locator for Children – Track your children


Kidnapping and Parental Abduction

ABP World Group™ will return with updated information about recommended GPS trackers during July 2015. Stay tuned. For more information about GPS trackers, send us an email: contact@abpworld.com

Parental child abduction – We offer needed support
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GPS Locator For Children Trackers

These days all of us are extremely busy and your teens are no different. It can make you crazy trying to keep track of them and their schedules, so what’s a frazzled parent to do?

You definitely want to know where they are at all times, but how can you keep track of them without constantly calling their cell phone (a recipe sure to put you on bad terms). How will you know if something happens to your teen or if they are in trouble of some sort?

GPS Trackers for Children – Top 10 GPS Tracker for Kids Reviews 2015

For years, parents have been limited to traditional methods of keeping track of their children‘s movements: standing in the playground, watching from the window, or asking them to phone home when they visit a friend’s house. But now anxious mothers and fathers are being offered a distinctly hi-tech method of monitoring their child’s every movement – tracking them by satellite. Relatives can receive text messages about the watch’s location direct from the device, pinpointing the street address of their youngster at the touch of a button.

It’s true that a cell phone is great to improve the safety of your teen, but what if they aren’t near the cell phone or possibly don’t want you to know where they are going. There is a solution and that is a GPS tracker for your teen and their car.

Read: Can a GPS prevent Parental Child Abductions?

There are two very good reasons to install a GPS tracking device in your teens car. The first is to track the vehicle in case of theft and the second is to ensure the safety of your teen.

Teens are notorious for underestimating the danger in many situations and they can often get themselves into trouble without even knowing how. You know about the likely dangers your teen might encounter, but getting them to listen to you (and believe you) is often an exercise in futility. So, you sit at home nights praying that your teen gets home safely. With a GPS tracking device installed in your teens car the need for you to worry is dramatically decreased.

You can keep track of where they are, where they are going and when you can expect them to arrive back home. Best of all, if they do not come home on time you can contact the police and have them easily track down the car, perhaps saving your teen from danger and harm.

There are various technologies that can help protect children, ranging from devices that send out a local alarm that can be heard from a couple hundred feet away, to very sophisticated dedicated GPS tracking devices.

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