Parental Kidnapping – ABP World Group Child Recovery Services


October 23, 2013

Source: ABP World Group Ltd. 

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Boy abducted 13 years ago in Florida found living in Missouri


September 26, 2013

Source: Fox News

sandy_hatte

Sandy Hatte, 60, was arrested in connection with the abduction. (LIVINGSTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE)

A boy abducted as an infant in Florida nearly 13 years ago has been reunited with his father, after a local school official grew suspicious about the boy’s school enrollment.

According to WDAF-TV, the school official contacted the sheriff’s office in Missouri’s Livingston County, where the boy was enrolled in school, and an investigation was conducted into the boy’s background.

The probe led to the arrest last week of the boy’s grandmother, Sandy Hatte, 60, who is being held on $25,000 bond, the station reports.

 “It was a good reunion.”

– Detective Eric Menconi

Sheriff’s detectives reportedly were able to locate the kidnapped boy’s biological father, who lives in Alabama. The detectives were able to uncover additional information about the boy that supported the allegation that the boy was abducted in 2000 when he was just an infant.

“The dad was working, come home from work and she was gone with the baby,” Detective Eric Menconi told WDAF-TV, Fox 4. “And he hasn’t been able to find them since.”

Hatte was homeless, but moved into the home of gentleman in Chillicothe, Mo., who offered the two a place to stay. The man said he had no idea Hatte was on the run until police showed up at his house, according to the station.

Hatte was taken into custody while officers went to the school to pick up the boy. Menconi said the boy was confused at first, but seems to be adapting well after being reunited with his father.

“It was a good reunion,” Menconi said. “You could tell within the first three minutes they hit it off pretty well. Since then I’ve been on the phone with the dad and from what I’m understanding it’s going very well. He’s adjusting.”

Click for the story from WDAF-TV, Fox 4.

 

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Prevent abduction: guarding against international parental abduction


August 16, 2013

Source: The Examiner

Parental child abduction is a federal crime. It is also a tragedy that jeopardizes children and has substantial long-term consequences for the “left-behind” parent, the child, the family, and society.

ChildrenFavourites

Children who are abducted by their parents are often suddenly isolated from their extended families, friends, and classmates. They are at risk of serious emotional and psychological problems. Similarly, left-behind parents experience a wide range of emotions including betrayal, loss, anger, and depression. In international cases, they often face unfamiliar legal, cultural, and linguistic barriers that compound these emotions.

In this section of our Web site, learn about the measures you can take to prevent your child from being wrongfully taken to or wrongfully kept in another country. In addition to the materials below, also see these important links:

Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program
Passport Requirements for Minors
Additional Prevention Tools
For Attorneys & Judges
International Parental Child Abduction Is Illegal

Under the laws of the United States and many foreign countries, international parental child abduction is crime. Removing a child from the United States against another parent’s wishes can be considered a crime in every U.S. state. In some cases an abducting parent may be charged with a Federal crime under the International Parental Kidnapping Crime Act (IPKCA). This can be the case even when neither parent holds a custody decree prior to the abduction. Nevertheless, a custody decree can be helpful to prevent an international parental child abduction, or to recover your child if he/she is abducted.

The Importance of a Custody Decree

A well-written custody decree is an important line of defense against international parental child abduction. In your custody decree, it may be advisable to include a statement that prohibits your child from traveling abroad without your permission or that of the court. Ask your attorney if you should obtain a decree of sole custody or a decree that prohibits the travel of your child without your permission or that of the court. If you have or would prefer to have a joint custody decree, you may want to make certain that it prohibits your child from traveling abroad without your permission or that of the court.

If your child is at risk of being taken to a country that partners with the United States under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), your custody decree should include the terms of the Hague Abduction Convention that apply if there is an abduction or wrongful retention (see country list).

The American Bar Association also suggests requesting the court, if the other parent is not a U.S. citizen or has significant ties to a foreign country, to require that parent to post a bond. This may be useful both as a deterrent to abduction and, if forfeited because of an abduction, as a source of revenue for you in your efforts to locate and recover your child.

REMINDER: Obtain several certified copies of your custody decree from the court that issued it. Give a copy to your child’s school and advise school personnel to whom your child may be released.

Two Parent Signature Law for a Passport

The United States does not have exit controls on its borders for holders of a valid passport. This makes preventing a passport from being issued to your child without your consent very important. Generally, if your child has a passport, it can be difficult to prevent the other parent from removing the child to another country without your permission.

U.S. law requires the signature of both parents, or the child’s legal guardians, prior to issuance of a U.S. passport to children under the age of 16. To obtain a U.S. passport for a child under the age of 16, both parents (or the child’s legal guardians) must execute the child’s passport application and provide documentary evidence demonstrating that they are the parents or guardians. If this cannot be done, the person executing the passport application must provide documentary evidence that he or she has sole custody of the child, has the consent of the other parent to the issuance of the passport, or is acting in place of the parents and has the consent of both parents (or of a parent/legal guardian with sole custody over the child to the issuance of the passport).

EXCEPTIONS: The law does provide two exceptions to this requirement: (1) for exigent circumstances, such as those involving the health or welfare of he child, or (2) when the Secretary of State determines that issuance of a passport is warranted by special family circumstances.

Read more: Passport Requirements for Minors

Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program

You may also ask that your child’s name be entered into the State Department’s Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program (CPIAP). Entering your child into the Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program will enable the Department to notify you or your attorney if an application for a U.S. passport for the child is received anywhere in the United States or at any U.S. embassy or consulate abroad. If you have a court order that either grants you sole custody, joint legal custody, or prohibits your child from traveling without your permission or the permission of the court, the Department may refuse to issue a new or renewal U.S. passport for your child. The Department may not, however, revoke a passport that has already been issued to the child. There is also no way to track the use of a passport once it has been issued, since there are no exit controls for people leaving the U.S. If your child already has a passport, you should take steps to ensure that it is kept from a potential abductor by asking the court or attorneys to hold it.

IMPORTANT TO KEEP IN MIND:

The United States does not have exit controls.
The Department of State may not revoke a passport that has been issued to a child, but you can ask a court to hold onto it.
There is no way to track the use of a passport once it has been issued.
Your child might also be a citizen of another country (dual nationality). Even if he/she does not have a U.S. passport, your child may be able to travel on the other country’s passport. .
The Privacy Act and Passports

Passport information is protected by the provisions of the Privacy Act (PL 93-579) passed by Congress in 1974. Information regarding a minor’s passport is available to either parent. Information regarding adults may be available to law enforcement officials or pursuant to a court order issued by the court of competent jurisdiction in accordance with (22 CFR 51.27). For further information regarding the issuance or denial of United States passports to minors involved in custody disputes, please contact Passport Services.

For additional information about prevention measures, please visit web site at:http://www.travel.state.gov/abduction/prevention/prevention_560.html.

Prevention Branch
Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
Email: PreventAbduction@state.gov
Phone: (888) 407-4747
Fax: (202) 736-9133
Website: travel.state.gov

 

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1-800-847-2315 US Toll free Number
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Worldwide 24/7 Emergency Number: 0047 40466526

Parental Abduction – Documentary Special: Anatomy of a kidnapping


January 3, 2013

Source: abc.net

An agreement between countries drawn up in The Hague is meant to prevent kids from being bounced around the world. Japan, though, stands out from the pack and for all the wrong reasons.

Japan-Flag

The government there is accused of being too slow to stop its citizens from taking their own children, without the approval of one parent, back to Japan.

For the first time, Sarah Dingle’s investigation takes us inside the mind of an abductor in the anatomy of a kidnapping.SARAH DINGLE: Eric Kalmus says it’s time to let go.

Listen to the whole interview here: http://mpegmedia.abc.net.au/news/audio/pm/201212/20121224-rcaffdocos-kidnapping.mp3

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ERIC KALMUS: I’m in a very good spot. I have a wonderful family. I need to give them the amount of energy that I was giving Amy. I’m still here, she’s still in my heart, I still love her. Any day that she picks up the phone and calls me, I’ll gladly go meet her wherever she is.

But yeah, I think I’ve allowed it to not be in my hands any more.

I’m better now. It doesn’t hurt like it used to. It doesn’t hurt like it used to.

Also read: Expert: Parental abduction never in child’s best interest

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What is Parental Child Abduction?


December 31, 2012

Parental child abduction occurs when a person who is connected to a child takes them away from their country of habitual residence, that is the country they normally reside in, without the permission of either those with parental responsibility or the courts.

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Most commonly, this takes place following a separation or divorce and is carried out by the parent who has not been awarded custody of the child.

Once a relatively rare phenomenon, an increase in cross-cultural marriages, higher divorce rates, changes in immigration laws and cheaper foreign travel have prompted a rise in international child custody disputes, some of which have resulted in parental child abduction as parents seek to take their children out of the country without permission.

Is It A Criminal Offence For A Parent To Abduct A Child?

Under the Child Abduction Act of 1984, it is a criminal offence for anyone connected with a child to take them out of the UK for more than 28 days without the consent of any other person who has parental responsibility for that child or a consenting order from the courts. A person is connected with the child if they are parent of the child, guardian or special guardian, anyone who has a residence order for the child or who has the child living with them.

Those required to give their consent would be the mother, the father (if he has parental responsibility), guardian, special guardian or anyone who has the child living with them or has permission from the court.

Also read: Expert: Parental abduction never in child’s best interest , Parental abduction

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Child Abduction: Why British Law Means Parents May Be Powerless To Get Their Children Back


August 29, 2012

Source: The Huffington Post

When Alison Shalaby’s seven-year-old daughter was taken to Egypt by her ex-husband, she found it hard to believe that after just one week in the country, her child was now legally considered “an Egyptian”.

She told The Huffington Post UK, “Whoever I contacted in the country said she was not British. That I was asking them to extradite one of their own. She’s seven-and-a-half, she’s been in the country a week, but they said she was Egyptian.”

Shalaby’s situation is all too common. Last week, British 13-year-old Adam Jones was in the headlines, apparently held in Qatar by his late father’s family.

adam jones

Adam Jones and his mother Rebecca, who says he has been held in Qatar since 2009 

His mother Rebecca Jones said she had been trying to bring him home since 2009 and has been lobbying the Foreign Office to reunite her with her son.

Adam wrote a letter to David Cameron, saying: “I think nobody cares about me. I beg you not to forget about me. Please let me go home to my family.”

He was apparently taken in 2009 when Ms Jones signed some documents in Arabic she was presented with by her late husband’s family. A Qatar court has denied her custody twice.

And this week, Leila Sabra organised a protest in Westminster to raise awareness of the case of her five year-old daughter A’ishah, who is in Egypt after her dad allegedly failed to return her after a routine custody visit in 2009.

She alleges that she won custody through the Egyptian courts, and had her daughter returned, but that she then went missing again on a second visit to her Dad in Egypt.

In the UK it is estimated more than 140,000 children go missing every year, one every three minutes, a statistic calculated by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection centre, which includes teenage runaways, parental abductions and kidnappings.

child abduction

Estelle Clayton, who went missing for six weeks after she was taken abroad by her father, back home with her mother, Aneta, is one of thousands who go missing each year 

Shalaby, the director of charity REUNITE, managed to get her daughter back when her former partner eventually moved back to Britain, but left her daughter in Egypt. She then started court proceedings.

She told The Huffington Post UK: “He didn’t really want to be in Egypt himself. I had to get a court order to get him to bring my daughter home, and he went to prison because he refused, he was in contempt of court.

“Often when a parent runs abroad, it’s a knee-jerk reaction, about going back ‘home’, and thinking it will be completely fine to just bring your child along, without thinking of their needs or the terrible upset it can cause to the child’s other parent.

“You think you can’t live without your child close to you, but that’s exactly what you are doing to the child’s other parent.”

The legal system in the UK means that if a child goes to a country, like Qatar, which is not signed up to the Hague Convention, or does not have a bi-lateral agreement with the UK regarding children, then it can be extremely difficult and costly to get a child back, with the British government powerless to help apart from through political lobbying.

Shalaby said: “There is a misconception that the government can do something about it. But they have no power to dictate to a foreign country, to tell them to adopt the Hague Convention.

“The change has to come from grassroots campaigners in that country.”

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Durham woman charged with kidnapping grandson in Hollis, arrested in Windsor, Connecticut


August 2, 2012

Source: naushuatelegraph

On Wednesday 8/1/12 at approximately 3:30PM the Hollis Police Department received a call regarding a possible parental kidnapping that had occurred.

Information received indicated that a 4 year old male child had been removed from the State by his mother contrary to a court order issued in the 9th Circuit Court, Nashua Family Division.

Hollis Police Patrol and Detective Division coordinated an immediate investigation in an attempt to locate the child. Over the following 8 hours, the child was tracked to a hotel in Windsor Locks Connecticut, where he was allegedly being concealed by a family member. Police officers began a dialogue with that family member in an effort to have the child returned to the State of New Hampshire and to the custody of his father, as ordered by the court. While this was ongoing, the Hollis Police Department applied for and was granted a felony arrest warrant for the family member that was concealing the child. Efforts to have the family member turn the child over to law enforcement voluntarily were unsuccessful and with the assistance of the Windsor Locks Connecticut Police, the missing child was located at a hotel in their town at approximately 11:00PM.

Arrested on a Fugitive From Justice charge in Windsor Locks, CT was Sandra Thorne, age 67, of 10 Watson Road in Durham, NH. The child is identified as Thorne’s grandson and was unarmed and in good condition when found. The child was returned to the custody of his father, John Testa. Thorne was held by the Windsor Locks Police Department in Connecticut overnight where she was due in their court this morning. Thorne faces extradition to New Hampshire to face charges of Interference with Custody, a Class B Felony.

The investigation in this case is ongoing and additional charges are possible.

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INTERNATIONAL MARRIAGE: Changing Japan as a safe haven for parental abductions


June 10, 2012

Source: Asahi.com

In February, 61-year-old Masahiro Yoshida was arrested for “abducting” his 7-year-old daughter from her elementary school in Ehime Prefecture the month before.

It marked the second time that Yoshida, a former professional jazz drummer, was driven to desperation and snatched his daughter, since his ex-wife has parental custody over his daughter, and he is not allowed to have any contact with her.

In Japan, courts do not recognize shared custody, and mothers retain custody in about 90 percent of court-mediated divorces involving minors.

In response to mounting criticism that Japan is a safe haven for parental abductions, the government finally submitted a bill to ratify the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, which provides for the return of unlawfully abducted children.

The legislation is unlikely to pass in the current Diet session, as deliberations of controversial bills to hike the consumption tax are taking center stage. But if enacted, the convention, which has 87 signatory countries, will mandate that Japan return children whom its nationals took from other countries in a divorce, unless it harms the child’s welfare.

The public’s perception in Japan is that such post-divorce disputes are taking place only between Japanese mothers and fathers from Western countries. But many Japanese parents now claim that the justice system here is equally tormenting those who lost custody over their children following a divorce.

The case involving Yoshida has much in common with the well-publicized arrest of an American man in 2009 after attempting to abduct his son and daughter and flee to the U.S. Consulate in Fukuoka.

According to Yoshida’s mother, Michiko, an 87-year-old former liquor store operator in Yokohama, it was her daughter-in-law who “abducted” her grandchild five years ago in an attempt to gain parental custody.

Michiko’s son is currently on trial at the Matsuyama District Court.

As Masahiro is likely to be given a prison sentence this time, Michiko said there must be fundamental flaws in the country’s justice system, which made her son a “criminal for just wanting to see his daughter.”

IS “GAIATSU” LAST RESORT?

In a nearly identical case, former family court judge Masanori Watanabe, 53, was arrested for abducting his daughter, then an elementary school third-grader, from a train station in Fukuoka in October 2005.

Watanabe, then a Yokohama-based lawyer, was subsequently given a suspended three-year prison sentence, dismissed from the bar association and cannot practice law.

“I certainly knew the consequences, but I thought it was my last opportunity to persuade her to come back to me when she becomes old enough to make her own judgments,” Watanabe said.

While waging court battles to gain custody of or visitation rights to their children, Yoshida and Watanabe campaigned for the Hague Convention, which they thought would help their causes.

“The convention means Japan’s last chance to review its cruel tradition to completely dismiss one parent’s right over children after divorce,” Watanabe said. “It is also my last resort to clear my name as a kidnapper.”

While the convention does not directly affect Japan-based families, Japanese and foreign parents here who lost custody pin hopes on their hopeful “gaiatsu,” or foreign pressure, scenario.

Lawyer Mikiko Otani, a member of the Legislative Council of the Ministry of Justice on the Hague Convention, said ratification will bring positive changes to the family courts here, which will examine and rule whether to return a child in accordance with the convention.

The family courts will need to examine and rule on what types of child-taking are unlawful and what serves as the best interest of children in ways that are convincing to foreign authorities.

If the expatriation of children becomes a common practice, courts need to break free from traditional reluctance in using force in family conflict cases. It will discourage parents from simply taking away their children, even by force, as is widely occurring today, she added.

“Ultimately, Japan will need to approve a form of shared custody, which is the norm in most of the countries that are signatory to the convention,” Otani said.

But gaiatsu inevitably draws a backlash. To the relief of Japanese parents who flee with their children from overseas, the proposed domestic legislation to set court procedures for a child’s repatriation sets strict criteria for judges to do so.

The vaguest and most potentially controversial clause among the six requirements is that courts need to ensure there will be no possibility that the concerned child suffers “physical or psychological” abuse once returned.

“Can courts expatriate its nationals, minors, over public opinion? I don’t think that can happen,” said a Japanese mother who fought a lengthy, exhausting court battle in Australia with her ex-husband over custody of their two children.

BACKLASH FOR CHANGE

Interestingly, parties opposing the convention, and moves that can lead to the idea of shared custody, include both those from conservative and liberal camps.

Conservatives say that the single custody system is vital to maintaining the integrity of “koseki,” or Japan’s family registry system.

Kensuke Onuki, a lawyer who has represented Japanese mothers who have brought their children to Japan, agrees that one of the divorced parents must back away, in order to make a child’s new environment more stable.

“I don’t think many Japanese can stand the Western way of communication between children and their divorced parents, in which both parents participate in their children’s growing-up process,” Onuki said.

A head of a parents’ group seeking visitation rights said that even many of its group members, mostly fathers, will find it too burdening to fulfill shared custody, given the limited roles they played in child-rearing before their divorce.

Recalling his days on a family court bench in the mid-1990s, ex-judge Watanabe expressed regret that he and his colleagues had no doubts that it serves the interests of children to grant custody to their mothers.

He added that judges believe that courts must respect women’s parental rights, because it was historically denied to them and they had to gain them through postwar feminism.

“I also remember my boss telling me that the court should give men a ‘free hand’ to start a new life by eliminating responsibility to raise their children, and I really did not find much wrong with it,” Watanabe said.

“Now I know how painful, how cruel it is for a parent, regardless of the mother or father, to have their access denied.”

Watanabe added that he knows that the signing of the Hague Convention may be just the beginning of change for Japanese society.

“But I won’t give up, because this is the only way left for me to show my love for my daughter,” he said.

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Parental Abduction: What You Should Do


Source: Steve Thompson

Every year, police reports are filed because one parent kidnaps their child from the other parent, usually because the abductor cannot get custody.

-If your child is a victim of parental abduction, your options are no doubt limited. Unless you have an idea where your child’s other parent might have run to, you are at the mercy of the police. However, there are a few things that you should definitely take care of as soon as possible.

First, you should know that parental abduction is against the law. If you have been given custody of your child by the courts — or if the child’s other parent has voluntarily relinquished custody — then he or she has no right to take your child without your permission. Usually, parental abductions occur in the middle of a custody dispute when one parent is certain that he or she will lose.

The next thing that you should consider is that it is often difficult to determine whether your child was abducted by his or her other parent or whether your child was the victim of an unrelated kidnapping. Don’t think that you should avoid calling the police because you’re afraid to get your ex-spouse in trouble; the police will consider all possibilities, and you don’t want to make the mistake of failing to report the abduction and then later discover that your child was the victim of a random crime.

You should also know that thousands of children go missing every year, whether from parental abductions, kidnappings, rapes, murders and runaways. The police are in a perpetual state of overload, which means that although your child’s parental abduction is a priority, the police cannot dedicate their days to the search. They have other crimes to investigate. With that said, you might want to consult a private investigator in the case of a parental abduction. He or she will have far more time to devote to the search, and although their powers of investigation are not as thorough as those of the police, P.I.’s are licensed by the state.

As far as you are concerned, your best bet is to start contacting people. Friends, family and acquaintances should all be alerted that a parental abduction has occurred. Contact the family and friends of the other parent to find out if he or she has been in contact with them, and let them know that it is illegal to harbor a fugitive. Get on the phone with the National Center for Mission and Exploited Children (800-843-5678) as well as any local organizations that help parents whose children have been abducted.

One major problem that you should consider is whether or not your child’s abductor may take him or her out of the country. Many perpetrators of parental abduction flee the country to avoid prosecution (and the removal of the child from their custody). Contact your local passport office (or the national office at 202-955-0231) to let them know that your child should not be allowed to get on a plane or be issued a passport. The police can likewise put a red flag on the abductor’s passport to keep him or her in the U.S.

And finally, you might want to resort to your local news media to help generate publicity. The televisions and radios can broadcast news briefs about the parental abduction of your child in the hopes that someone will report a sighting. Many children have been found over the years because the clerk at a drug store or the teller at a bank recognizes the child from his or her picture on the news and calls it in. While you can’t count on this happening, it’s certainly a possibility.

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How To Spot Signs Of Potential Parental Kidnapping


Source: Garett Law Group

As indicated by the Department of Justice, around 200,000 kids are subjects of parental kidnapping year after year. Six percent of such parental kidnapping incidents are open for six months or longer. Regrettably, some never have been closed at all.

This is a incredible, albeit sobering, fact. The individual who a parent should be able to trust with their children, the other parent, their spouse, can also grow to be so cold and callous as to betray the trust of not only their significant other, but the trust of their own child!

Parental kidnapping does not just up and happen out of the blue. Certainly, the crime itself may come as a shock to most, however you can always find issues that produce the parent’s feeling of desperation and those examples are most always the effect of a recent divorce, as well as loss of the child as a result of a child custody hearing.

What is Parental Kidnapping, Exactly?

To determine parental kidnapping, the parental right of child custody must be discussed first. The reason being is the parent that is determined by the judge as the child’s legal guardian and/or granted child custody, can by law take that child anywhere they desire within reason.

Child custody starts and ends with the true biological parents of a child. Void of any unique mitigating factors, parents can make almost all decisions involving how, and in addition where, they opt to rear their child. The parent has the legal standing to choose the child’s education, their healthcare, religion and the topic at hand, location of the child’s home. The laws are quite clear and parents do not need to petition the court for legal right to make one of these selections regarding their child.

The issues that reflect back regarding parental kidnapping and which parent is the victim surrounds those particular mitigating issues. Of which, there are several. Although these factors could be a parent’s ability to make these selections, both legally and rationally, has come under question due to their mental capacity, or even their physical capacity. For example if one parent was experiencing dementia, or was in the penitentiary, stationed in a foreign country, etc. In this sort of situation, attorneys would ask the family court for a child custody hearing. The complexities could be limitless, however it typically involves just one – divorce.

Parental Kidnapping and The Role Divorce Plays;

Divorces concerning child custody are as challenging and complex as any suit which has. In cases pertaining to custody of the children, lives are held in the balance. The destiny of a child, as well as the absolute heartbreaking loss of one of the two parents taking part lies directly at the feet of the judge. Custody is a significant hearing in the lives of families concerned.

When a divorce has been filed, the divorce attorneys for both parties will talk about child custody, may it be joint custody or sole custody, visitation rights, financial obligations, health care insurance coverage for the child, child support and numerous additional details still to be haggled over in family court. Unfortunately, when there is no common agreements made regarding joint custody between the mother and father, one will certainly walk out of court having lost their entire family with one stroke of a pen.

Having lost legal custody of the child, the parent has a diminished legal right to make selections in connection with the rearing of that child. From that moment on, any right of that parent is permitted primarily depending on any stipulations decided on by the parties, divorce lawyers and ordered by the court. This may often be more emotional distress than a person might tolerate. It is this experience which could very well stimulate this usually reasonable and rational person to commit a totally illogical and non-rational offense – parental kidnapping.

When, one parent, voluntarily and knowingly takes a child with the aim to deny the custodial parent of their legal rights specified under the judge’s order of child custody, has committed the crime of parental kidnapping. It matters in no way what county, what city, nor what state somebody suspected of parental kidnapping might go. Under the federal laws that oversee such cases, the Parental Kidnapping Prevention Act rigorously enforces the child custody decision made by the judge of any and all states. Every state will value, uphold and honor the child custody decision of another state.

What to Watch For;

If you, or somebody you know or cherish has recently, is presently suffering through a divorce which entail child custody, there are particular warning signs you, or they, have to be on the lookout for to possibly avoid being, and the child being, the victim of parental kidnapping. Through the procedure, if a parent starts to reveal the appearance of not being emotionally, or mentally intact as they once were, advise your divorce lawyer of this and let it be known and documented. The person might indeed be in need of mental help or counseling to be able to better manage the events unfolding beyond their control. It is logical, though having said that, be on guard.

An additional signal to look out for is after the proceedings have all happened and things have to some degree calmed down, the parent begins returning the child from visitation later than arranged. It is wise to have your divorce lawyer make the periods of visitation recorded in the court papers. Each party should recognize and agree on these times and they should be respected and enforced. If the time of return begins to be an issue, politely remind them of the order of the court and call your divorce attorney and ask his or her guidance on the problem at once.

Anytime the parent says or does something that remotely implies there may be a concern, or if they ever threaten in anyway the possibility of not returning the child, or “taking the child away and you never see them again”, without delay end all contact with the parent and promptly call your divorce attorney and the police. Never take this sort of threat as a joke and never allow your child go away with the parent unsupervised again. Have your divorce attorney ask the judge for the visitation rights to be suspended and/or supervised.

In The Event Of Parental Kidnapping;

Should the parent has left with your child without any reason that you weren’t made previously aware of, there might be an issue and you need to start calling the other parent immediately. After a couple of phone calls and no reply and no return phone call, call law enforcement and have them go to the parent’s house to check things out. Don’t go by yourself! Anything might happen when dealing with someone perhaps volatile. At the first indication of parental kidnapping, call the police. The faster the authorities can start working on the case, the better the likelihood of a speedy reunion with you and your child.

Typically, the wronged parent does not want to believe their ex might be capable of parental kidnapping. It is this refusal that allows critical minutes and hours tick away and the child to get further and further away from home. Again, parental kidnapping occurs 200,000 times each year, according to the Dept. of Justice. Take notice, be on guard, do not tolerate threats and your child won’t become 200,001.

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