Revealed: Hundreds of words to avoid using online if you don’t want the government spying on you


June 1, 2013

Source: Daily Mail

Dept. of Homeland Security Forced to Release List of Keywords Used to Monitor Social Networking Sites.

  • Department of Homeland Security forced to release list following freedom of information request
  • Agency insists it only looks for evidence of genuine threats to the U.S. and not for signs of general dissent

Homeland_Security

The Department of Homeland Security has been forced to release a list of keywords and phrases it uses to monitor social networking sites and online media for signs of terrorist or other threats against the U.S.

The intriguing the list includes obvious choices such as ‘attack’, ‘Al Qaeda’, ‘terrorism’ and ‘dirty bomb’ alongside dozens of seemingly innocent words like ‘pork’, ‘cloud’, ‘team’ and ‘Mexico’.

Released under a freedom of information request, the information sheds new light on how government analysts are instructed to patrol the internet searching for domestic and external threats.

The words are included in the department’s 2011 ‘Analyst’s Desktop Binder‘ used by workers at their National Operations Center which instructs workers to identify ‘media reports that reflect adversely on DHS and response activities’.

Department chiefs were forced to release the manual following a House hearing over documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit which revealed how analysts monitor social networks and media organisations for comments that ‘reflect adversely’ on the government.

However they insisted the practice was aimed not at policing the internet for disparaging remarks about the government and signs of general dissent, but to provide awareness of any potential threats.

As well as terrorism, analysts are instructed to search for evidence of unfolding natural disasters, public health threats and serious crimes such as mall/school shootings, major drug busts, illegal immigrant busts.

The list has been posted online by the Electronic Privacy Information Center – a privacy watchdog group who filed a request under the Freedom of Information Act before suing to obtain the release of the documents.

In a letter to the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Counter-terrorism and Intelligence, the centre described the choice of words as ‘broad, vague and ambiguous’.

Scroll down for full list

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Threat detection: Released under a freedom of information request, the information sheds new light on how government analysts are instructed to patrol the internet searching for domestic and external threats

They point out that it includes ‘vast amounts of First Amendment protected speech that is entirely unrelated to the Department of Homeland Security mission to protect the public against terrorism and disasters.’

A senior Homeland Security official told the Huffington Post that the manual ‘is a starting point, not the endgame’ in maintaining situational awareness of natural and man-made threats and denied that the government was monitoring signs of dissent.

However the agency admitted that the language used was vague and in need of updating.

Spokesman Matthew Chandler told website: ‘To ensure clarity, as part of … routine compliance review, DHS will review the language contained in all materials to clearly and accurately convey the parameters and intention of the program.’

MIND YOUR LANGUAGE: THE LIST OF KEYWORDS IN FULL

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Here’s Why Terrorists Might Target Oslo


The news of a bomb in Oslo today has left many scratching their heads as to why a country often associated with peace would be a target for such a huge act of violence.

However, the country is an active military force in Afghanistan and Libya, and also angered Islamic communities when a Norwegian newspaper republished cartoons depicting the Muslim prophet Muhammad.

A quick look reveals a number of plots and threats have been made against the country in recent months:

  • A group linked to Al Qaeda (and including one Chinese member of the Muslim minority Uighurs) had been arrested last year in relation to a plot, reports The New York Times.
  • Earlier this month Kurdish Islamic cleric Mullah Krekar, who was being deported from the country, reportedly made threats against Norwegian politicians, according to the AP.

And that’s only looking at the Islamic angle.

The other big possibility, touted by some on Twitter, is that the attack could have come from the Norwegian right. The Norwegian far right were once a feared proposition but have been relatively mellow in recent years due to the success of populist success of the Progress Party.

Terror in Oslo – Norway. Major explosion close to the prime ministers office.


Major blast rocks Norway capitalA major explosion hits close to the offices of Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg in the Norwegian capital Oslo.-BBC

Norway: Blast near prime minister’s office in Oslo

Video grab from EVN of Oslo, Norway - 22 July 2011Windows were shattered and smoke was rising from central Oslo

A large explosion has hit near government headquarters in the Norwegian capital Oslo.

The blast is thought to have caused damage to the offices of Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg and a number of other official buildings.

Mr Stoltenberg was unharmed, said local media, but witnesses said at least eight people were injured in the city centre explosion.

Pictures from the scene showed glass from shattered windows in the streets.

All roads into the city centre have been closed, said the NRK newspaper. Television images showed rubble in the street and smoke around some buildings.

An NRK journalist, Ingunn Andersen, said the headquarters of tabloid newspaper VG had also been damaged.

“I see that some windows of the VG building and the government headquarters have been broken. Some people covered with blood are lying in the street,” Associated Press news agency quoted him as saying.

“It’s complete chaos here. The windows are blown out in all the buildings close by.”

Published by: ABP World Group  Executive Protection
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You Kidnap My Child, And I Get In Trouble?


Divorce

That word hurts.

In the ideal world, a child doesn’t know that word. In today’s world (arguably the exact opposite of ideal), a child not only knows that word but knows many friends with divorced parents, including his own. Actually, my friends and I get excited when we hear about someone’s parents still together. You can literally hear us exclaiming something like, “WOW. How did that happen??” Parents staying together “in good times and in bad” and “in sickness and in health” is a rarity.
According to the enrichment journal on the current divorce rate in America, first marriages fail 50 percent of the time; second marriages fail 60 percent; and third marriages fail 73 percent. Only ten years ago, the U.S. Bureau of Census reported a 40 percent failure of first marriages.
If being apart is more common than staying together, child custody battles are bound to be everywhere.
As a teacher, I’ve seen more than several cases. I would hope for a situation where both parents would walk into a conference and things would go smoothly, as both want the best for their child. And in some circumstances, this would be the case. Excellent. A smooth meeting.
And then the other scene would take place: Mom accuses Dad of hiding things; Dad accuses Mom of lying to the child. If anything went awry, fingers were pointed. My heart always went to the sweet child caught in the middle.
Sorrowfully, this may be the least of child custody complications.
Parental kidnapping occurs more often than reported. According to Lost Children, more than 350,000 family abductions occur in the U.S. each year – that is nearly 1,000 per day!
Recently, an American dad was in the news. Why? His ex-wife took their two children to her home country, Japan. Not on a visit to see family. She fled the United States with the kids.
Need some history on this couple? Here’s the breakdown: Christopher and Noriko were married for 14 years. They lived in Japan for a while but moved back to the United States before the divorce. She agreed during the divorce to remain in the United States. She didn’t. The courts then gave sole custody to Christopher.
What’s a father to do? Forget about it, not deal with it, and never see his children again? Let the mother do whatever she wants? Let her get away with kidnap?
No. He went to be a father. He went to make things right. Easy enough, yeah? No. Japan still recognizes the mother as the sole custodian.
Christopher abducted the children as they were on their way to school.
Pause. I am NOT saying it’s okay to kidnap children – even your own. Children are traumatized enough as it is. However…(nah, I’ll wait for that. Back to our story.)
Christopher ended up getting caught, seconds away from the front gate of the U.S. consulate’s office. Ouch. He’s currently in jail for child abduction in Japan.
Now, where was I? Yes. However…
Shouldn’t certain things be understood between nations, like custody, for example? Different nations have different rules. I understand that some things are different…steal an apple here? Not a big problem. Steal an apple somewhere else? Could be a big problem. But children’s rights? Kidnap? I’m thinking that should be a lot closer to universal. Why isn’t it? Last time I checked, children are humans….and they have rights. So, this case could be argued as a human rights case.
And if divorce rates are rising, shouldn’t our concern for parental kidnapping rise as well?
Source: NeonTommy

Published by: ABP World Group International Child Recovery Service

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Non Custodial Parental Kidnapping


If I think that the other parent may abduct my child, is there anything I can do?

You may want to immediately contact a lawyer who can help you figure out what you can do to try to prevent abduction.

You can convince a judge that your concerns are “reasonable” based on the facts, a court may take steps to prevent the other parent from abducting your child. If you think that the other parent may flee the state with the purpose of kidnapping your child, then there are a couple of possible options that might work:

  1. File a criminal complaint against the other parent (but this may only work if the other parent is in the process of fleeing the jurisdiction in violation of a court order or with the purpose of kidnapping your child)
  2. Attempt to get an emergency temporary restraining order from family court.

If you think that the other parent may try to take your child out of the country, you could ask the court to seize your child’s passport so s/he cannot leave the country.  This is important due to the fact that there is no way to track the use of a passport once it has been issued, since there are no exit controls for people leaving the U.S.*

Also, if you are seeking custody of your children, you can ask the judge to include a provision that the non-custodial parent is not allowed to travel with your child out of the state or the country. If you already have a custody order, you can ask the judge to add this requirement to it.   However, even if the judge does not agree to order that the child cannot be removed from the county, there is still something you can do.  The State Department provides the following service:

“You can ask that your child’s name be entered into the State Department’s Children’s Passport Issuance Alert Program by contacting the Office of Children’s Issues’ Prevention Unit at 202-736-9156 or faxing a request to 202-736-9133. This will enable the Department to notify you or your attorney if an application for a U.S. passport for the child is received anywhere in the United States or at any U.S. embassy or consulate abroad.  If you have a court order that either grants you sole custody, joint legal custody, or prohibits your child from traveling without your permission or the permission of the court, the Department may refuse to issue a new or renewal U.S. passport for your child. The Department may not, however, revoke a passport that has already been issued to the child.”  http://travel.state.gov/family/abduction/prevention/prevention_560.html

For more information on keeping the other parent from taking your children out of the country, see our Custody InfoKidnapping Info page.

For emergency assistance contact:

ABP World Group International Child Recovery Service

The goal of ABP World Group Ltd. is to locate, negotiate and recover your missing child.
We can dispatch personnel to most locations in the world; we specialize in locating missing children up to ages 18.

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