Torn apart: silent victims of parental child abduction


July 12, 2012

Source: Radioaustralia.net

Each year thousands of children around the world are victims of parental child abduction. They’re innocent victims caught up in a very adult world where disputes between parents have gone from bad to worse.

There is an international legal treaty in place to try to deter the practice, but many nations in the Asia Pacific are not signatories and now the Australian Government is being asked to try to change that. Catherine Graue reports.

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FREE legal assistance for parents of abducted children


Source: F4E

FREE legal assistance will be available to parentswho are dealing with the abduction of a child from Australia.

The federal government has reached an agreement for new funding with the International Social Services (ISS) to provide the new service.

ISS already provides counselling and mediation services which are funded by the Attorney-General’s Department.

Federal Attorney-General Nicola Roxon said the service is designed to provide practical support to parents in distressing circumstances.

“We want to make it as straightforward as possible for parents to get the assistance they need when dealing with the abduction of their children from Australia,” Ms Roxon said in a statement.

ISS can be contacted by phoning 1300 657 843 or online at www.iss.org.au

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One key to ABP World Group`s successful recovery and re-unification of your loved one is to use all necessary means available

Contact us here: Mail

Join the Facebook Group: International Parental Child Abduction

NOTE: We are always available 24/7

U.S Phone Number: (646) 502-7443

UK Phone Number: 020 3239 0013 –

Or you can call our 24h Emergency phone number: +47 45504271

Should Aussie government cut off child support to parental kidnappers?


Source: Global Justice Initiative

The Australian government has proposed changes to that country’s existing law that enables a parent who kidnaps his or her own child to continue collecting child support from the child’s left-behind parent.

Some say that the availability of child support can reward and even enable parental kidnapping. Others argue that compromising a child’s access to continuous support in order to punish or deter the abducting parent could deprive the child of critical food, shelter, medicine and other care. And, in some cases, the link between a parental abductor and the child support services office may be the sole means of locating the abductor and the missing child.

Read the whole story here: Global Justice Initiative

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Child abduction laws set for overhaul


Source: Sky news Australia

A Senate inquiry has been told laws surrounding international parental child abductions must be changed.

Lauchlan Leishman and Ken Thompson fronted a Senate committee in Canberra on Friday, arguing that the system surrounding international child abductions needs a desperate overhaul.

Mr Leishman, whose son was taken out of the country in 2008 and has not been returned, labelled it a ‘long, painful and exhaustive process’ that had come at great financial cost.

‘Some people say it’s a civil matter between the parents, (but) the reality is that the child has been abducted,’ he told the inquiry.

‘And if I stole someone else’s child I would be hounded by the criminal justice system.

‘In our view, it’s no different.’

In Australia, international child abductions are mostly considered civil matters, with returns negotiated depending on where the child is taken and if the parents are currently before the Family Court.

In the strongest case scenario, if the child is taken to a country that is signatory to the Hague Convention and the parents are before the Family Court, technically child abductions are a criminal act.

But Mr Thompson, whose son was also taken in 2008 and returned this year, said the Australian Federal Police (AFP) often had its hands tied, and prevented from acting without the consent of the signatory country.

It will only request Interpol alerts if an arrest warrant has been issued for the abducting parent, and that can only be done when the ‘left behind parent’ requests one through the Family Court.

Even then, abducting parents had no problem getting around.

Mr Thompson’s story made headlines after he cycled 6500km around Europe in a bid to find his son, leading to a tip-off that the youngster was in the Netherlands.

The former NSW deputy fire chief said the system was full of holes and provided inadequate protection for what was ‘one of the most extreme acts of abuse a parent can inflict upon their own child’.

He noted that if a child is abducted to a country that hasn’t signed up to the Hague Convention, or if his or her whereabouts were unknown, left behind parents were basically on their own.

Spending up to $100,000 was not unusual, and parents sometimes had to fight for financial assistance or even to halt child support payments.

Mr Thompson also urged for abductions to be made a crime across the board, if only to empower the police to act, rather than as punishment.

‘I’m not advocating for a moment that international parental child abduction should be a crime for the purpose of prosecuting and imprisoning a parent – that’s last resort,’ Mr Thompson said.

The Family Law Council believes parental abductions shouldn’t be made a general criminal offence, arguing international courts might be less likely to order parents back to Australia.

It did however recommend that wrongful retentions – where a child is lawfully taken overseas but not returned – have the same criminality as wrongful removals.

The Senate inquiry is due to report by October 31.

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